Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Kite Runner Chapters 14-17

We've talked a bit about whether or not Amir has shown growth. Based on this reading (chapters 14-17), comment on Amir's growth (or lack thereof). You must use at least one quote to support your arguement.

14 comments:

Chris J said...

Despite Amir physically growthing up, it appears that he has yet to mentally grow as an individual. Throughout the reading of chapters 14-17 it is apparent that Amir has yet to show significant growth. Amir still exemplifies the qualities of being a coward that caused him so much pain in the past. When Rahim Klan reveals the tragic tale of Hassan's life to Amir he is deeply saddened. Klan then reveals that he wants Amir to go to Kabul to being back Sohrab. Amir resorts back to his cowardly instincts by saying "I don't want to go to Kabul. I can't...Kabul is a dangerous place" (Hosseini 221). This demonstrates that Amir is betraying Hassan for a second time due to his own cowardness.

-Chris Jordan

Michelle Lee said...

I want to think that Amir has shown growth throughout the book but I feel bewteen chapters 14-17 he is still trying to grow.

When Rahim Khan asks Amir to find Sohrab and take him to the other orphanage, Amir comments by saying, "'I have a wife in America, a home, a career, and a family. Kabul is a dangerous place, you know that, and you'd have me risk everything for...'" I think this doesn't show much growth in Amir. If he had accepted his past and tried to make things better, he wouldn't have hesitated to help out his best friends son.

Then Rahim Khan mentions what Amir's father had once said about "'a boy who won't stand up for himself becomes a man who can't stand up for anything.'" Amir quickly realizes that maybe he did grow up to become that and he agrees to go find him. I think Amir will eventually grow up but it's taking him time.

Anonymous said...

In these past chapters, Amir received a phone call that would change his life forever. Rahim Khan had called him from Peshawar to ask him to come to Pakistan for an urgent matter, however the driving motivation in Amir's departure was Rahim Khan's final words when he said to Amir, "Come, there is a way to be good again" (192).

When Amir met with Rahim Khan, he recieved a letter from Hassan along with grave news that the Taliban had left Sohrab, Hassan's son, an orphan. Amir doesn't show any growth or maturity in hearing the news about Hassan and feels as if an old scab had been torn off. Amir doesn't handle the idea of him traveling to Kabul to rescue Sohrab from the Taliban. At this instance, Amir shows his lack of bravery and honor by saying to Rahim Khan, "Why me? Why can't you pay someone here to go? I'll pay for it if it's a matter of money" (221). It is apparent that Amir hasn't become more honorable since he was a child as he knowingly substitutes the answer Rahim Khan wants with a cowardly outlet.

Further on, Amir learns more disheartening news and continues to show his childish behavior. When Rahim Khan informs Amir that Hassan and he share Baba as a father, Amir reacts in a tirade of anger as he reflects on the lie that consumed his life. After this, Amir dishonors and mocks himself by storming out of Rahim Khans apartment. Amir hasn't shown any growth as he reacts in denial and wishes he was never told any of the information. Amir is being a coward by avoiding the truth and by attempting to try to forget his past.

-Cam

Anonymous said...

I don't believe that Amir has fully grown. He has come along way from his childhood however he has a long way to go. When talkin with Rahim Khan it seems as though he can't handle some of the things he says. he doesn't want to got o Kabul. Also, he doesn't even bring up Hassan. Rahim Khan has to do it. it felt strange for Amir to even say his name. "Hassan", I said. When was the last time i had spoken his name" After the incident hat had happened along time ago, he still couldnt get it out of his mind. he wasn't mature enough to confess or even talk to someone about it. He just let it sit and bother him.

-Cassie Boulay

Gil said...

Prior to these three chapters, I was beginning to believe that Amir was showing growth. He was starting to put Hassan in the past and could function in society without feeling guilty all the time. Later, when Rahim asked Amir to "grant an old man his dying wish,"(221) Then, Amir says that Baba was right about Amir becoming a man who could not stand up for anything. Amir would not help Hassan's child. This shows that Amir has not shown growth with respect to courage and honor.

Rachel said...

I think that if Amir was showing growth he would have gladly went to get Sohrab and bring him to live with the Caldwells. Instead, Amir says, "Why me? Why can't you pay someone here to go? I'll pay for it if it's a matter of money" (221).

After learning that Hassan is dead, he can't even bring himself to do this one thing for him and Rahim Khan. He can't do one thing to show he ever liked Hassan, ever cared for him. This is not how someone who grows acts. Amir should have accepted the request with no questions asked, but instead, he doesn't.

Anonymous said...

I do not think Amir has shown growth because he is still immature and a dishonest person. He lied to his father long ago and never addmitted to the truth before his fathers death. A mature man would have come forth and admitted to his faults and taken responsibility for them.After Rham Khan asks Amir for the favor of retrieving Hassan's son..Amir replies "I have a wife in America, a home, a carer, and a family. Kabul is a dangerous place, you know that, and you'd have me risk everything for..." This shows Amir's selfishness that has never really gone away and proves that he has not grown up mentally. Though he eventually accepts this challenge it is still obvious he needs a lot more growing up to do if he wants to truly be forgiven.
- Krista Dewey

Patrick Hillman said...

In chapters 10-13, Amir semed to be growing up. He started a family and was getting his life together. In chapter fourteen, it even seemed that he was growing up even more by goin gto vist Rahim. This shows how he was willing to face his fears and his past by going back. However, Rahim eventaully asks him to do him a favor but Amir refuses. After Rahim says how much Baba believed something was missing in Amir, Amir responds by saying, "Maybe Babe was right". Amir is still the coward he was before and still only cares about himself. He has a chance to redeem his past, and he chooses not to. His excuse is that he has his own problems to worry about. Although Rahim might be asking a little too much, Amir completely denies the request showing his inability to accpet responsibility.

Anonymous said...

In the beginning of the novel, I did not like Amir that much. He treated Hassan horribly, even though Hassan worshipped the ground that Amir walked on. Then, Amir saw Hassan getting raped and all that he could do was hide behind a dumpster and watch. He did not stick up for his "friend" when Hassan needed him the most. This showed how unreliable and selfish Amir could be. Once Amir became a married man, he seemed to grow up a little bit, but he could never let what happened to Hassan leave his mind. Amir has been haunted by that day since it happened. "When was the last time I had spoken his name? Those thorny old barbs of guilt bore into me once more, as if speaking his name had broken a spell, set them free to torment me anew."(202) I think that Amir has grown as a man and has done an excellent job of supporting his wife and writing novels, but he has never really been able to get over what happened to Hassan. Unless he was to receive forgiveness from Hassan himself, which he is unable to do because Hassan was murdered, then I do not think that he is ever going to be able to let go of the past.
Ashlie

Lauren said...

I was one of the people that wrote on the last blog that I thought Amir had grown. However, after reading these chapters, it clearly shows that Amir has not learned or grown from his experiences. The fact that Amir will not help Hassan's son is astounding to me. After how Amir treated Hassan so horribly, years later Hassan still treated with reverence, and Amir will not in honor of him help his poor son. Rahim perfectly describes how Amir is to this day, "I remember he said to me, Rahim, a boy who won't stand up for himself becomes a man who can't stand up to anything. I wonder is that what you have become?" Baba was right in this prediction, because Amir clearly is not a strong man, and sits back and lets horrible things happen to people that he cares about.

Jess Franklin said...

I think that Amir has grown. Expect when Rahim Khan asks him to go back to Afghanistan, and Amir has to think about it "I have a wife in America, a home, a caree, and a family...". I think he truely feels bad for what he did to Hassan, but if he had fully grown up he would have went without hesitation.

Ravi said...

Although Amir has grown up physically, he is still mentally unstable and cowardly. When he hears the entire story of what happened in Kabul after he and Baba left, he feels so bad and helpless for Hassan. Rahim Khan offers that he can still help by returning to Kabul to fetch Hassan's lost son; to this, he immediately refuses saying "Rahim Khan, I don't want to go to Kabul, I can't!" (220)
Hassan, who would always say to Amir "for you, a thousand times over", had lost his life and the only thing he left in the world, Sohrab, was lost in Kabul and all Amir could do is ignore Sohrab's life.
Further, when he finds out that Sohrab is his nephew, he "stormed out of the apartment" (222)
I dont think Amir has grown at all, and I still would like to knock him out.

Marissa Marvel said...

After reading these chapters i feel as though he still has not fully grown. When asked by Rahim Kahn to go find Hassan's son in Kabul, Amir shows himself to be a coward. His response is "Why me? Why can't you pay someone here to go? I'll pay for it if it's a matter of money" (221). Obviously, Rahim says that it is never a matter of money. He knows that Amir did what he did (or did not do)after the kite tournament and is still beating himself up over it. This is Amir's chance to "be good again" and help Hassan by saving his child from the harsh conditions of Afghanistan. If Amir was not completely thinking of himself when he was asked this question he would have jumped at the opportuniy. He has been living with this guilt for many years, and this is his chance to prove that he has changed. He is almost betraying Hassan for another time. He knows that Hassan would do it for him, so he should do it for Hassan.

Parisa said...

Amir "[has] a way to be good again." By traveling to Afghanistan, Amir is finally facing what he has run from for so long.

This is definetly a sign of a maturity that he lacked as a boy.