Friday, October 17, 2008

A Thousand Splendid Suns


My English class is starting to read Kite Runner so I will not talk about that book now, instead, I will talk about Khaled Hosseini's more recent book, A Thousand Splendid Suns. This novel covers three decades of life in Afghanistan through the eyes of Mariam and Laila. Brought together through their marriages to Rasheed, a cruel and brutal older man, they eventually become friends and allies. In a country where women have no rights and are completely dependent on their fathers and husbands, where beatings are common and acceptable, these women still find ways to persevere. Hosseini gives the reader an understanding of the hardships and abuse suffered by Afghan women through the day to day lives of Mariam and Laila. That they carry on and even dare to hope for a better future is a testament to the resiliency of the human spirit. I highly recommend this book. Have you read it? If so, what did you think?

3 comments:

Mr. Kefor said...

Great book. I enjoyed "The Kite Runner" so much that I immediately picked up "Suns", all the while doubting it would live up to my expectations. I also wondered whether or not I could relate as well to the tale of 2 women as well as I could relate to the tale of 2 men. After reading both, it's tough to say which one is better. Hosseini takes a different approach in terms of point of view and voice in "Suns" as not to simply repeat his succesful first-person narrative in "TKR".

Anonymous said...

I too enjoyed Hosseini's second book and would highly recommend it to anyone who is enjoying reading the Kite Runner. I actually like this book better than his first book because it reveals the horrific yet harmonic bond shared by Islamic women that is not seen by many. I was enlightened by the bonds that these amazing women formed and was appalled at the cruelty towards women. Hosseini does an incredible job in portraying the reality faced by Islamic women. Hosseini has gained fame through these stories as the words of Soraya become a reality, "Sad stories make good books."

-Cam

Catrina said...

Man, do Hosseini's editors really like that font, or what?